Hypnosis awareness of Leo Tolstoy
shows in his book entitled
The Kingdom of God Is Within You

Leo Tolstoy

As I have kept on writing the contents of my Toronto Hypnosis Clinic website, I have mentioned in many places the concept of hypnosis which happens on the stage of life.

Everybody knows about the hypnosis performed on the stage of entertainment, but not too many people can see clearly that what happens on the stage of entertainment, also happens on the stage of life.

Not to many people see that the whole world is governed by hypnosis.

I am writing this page because I have recently found out that what I’ve always seen happening in the world - on the small, and the very large scale alike - had been also clearly seen by such a literary giant as the famous author of War and Peace - Leo Tolstoy.

With a great delight I’m presenting here how Leo Tolstoy had seen the world through the lens of hypnosis happening of the stage of life.

What follows are the fragments of his book entitled: The Kingdom of God is Within YOU.

Hypnotizing influence of the church

All churches without exception avail themselves of hypnotism. Every art, from architecture to poetry, is brought into requisition to work its effect on men's souls and to reduce them to a state of stupefaction, and this effect is constantly produced. 

This use of hypnotizing influence on men to bring them to a state of stupefaction is especially apparent in the proceedings of the Salvation Army, who employ new practices to which we are unaccustomed: trumpets, drums, songs, flags, costumes, marching, dancing, tears, and dramatic performances. 

But this only displeases us because these are new practices. Were not the old practices in churches essentially the same, with their special lighting, gold, splendour, candles, choirs, organ, bells, vestments, intoning, etc? 

But however powerful this hypnotic influence may be, it is not the chief nor the most pernicious activity of the Church. 

The chief and most pernicious hypnotic activity of the Church is that which is directed to the deception of children—these very children of whom Christ said: "Woe to him that offendeth one of these little ones." 

From the very first awakening of the consciousness of the child they begin to deceive him, and instil into him with the utmost solemnity what they do not themselves believe in, and they continue to instil it into him till the deception has by habit grown into the child's nature. 

They studiously deceive the child on the most important subject in life, and when the deception has so grown into his life that it would be difficult to uproot it, then they reveal to him the whole world of science and reality, which cannot by any means be reconciled with the beliefs that have been instilled into him, leaving it to him to find his way as best he can out of these contradictions. 

If one set oneself the task of trying to confuse a man so that he could not think clearly nor free himself from the perplexity of two opposing theories of life which had been instilled into him from childhood, one could not invent any means more effectual than the treatment of every young man educated in our so-called Christian society. 

It is terrible to think what the churches do to men. But if one imagines oneself in the position of the men who constitute the Church, we see they could not act differently. 

The churches are placed in a dilemma: the Sermon on the Mount or the Nicene Creed—the one excludes the other. 

If a man sincerely believes in the Sermon on the Mount, the Nicene Creed must inevitably lose all meaning and significance for him, and the Church and its representatives together with it. 

If a man believes in the Nicene Creed, that is, in the Church, that is, in those who call themselves its representatives, the Sermon on the Mount becomes superfluous for him. 

And therefore the churches cannot but make every possible effort to obscure the meaning of the Sermon on the Mount, and to attract men to themselves. 

It is only due to the intense zeal of the churches in this direction that the influence of the churches has lasted hitherto.

Let the Church stop its work of hypnotizing the masses, and deceiving children even for the briefest interval of time, and men would begin to understand Christ's teaching. 

But this understanding will be the end of the churches and all their influence. And therefore the churches will not for an instant relax their zeal in the business of hypnotizing grown-up people and deceiving children

This, then, is the work of the churches: to instil a false interpretation of Christ's teaching into men, and to prevent a true interpretation of it for the majority of so-called believers.”

Hypnotizing influence of the state

And to-morrow some crazy ruler will say some stupidity, and another will answer in the same spirit, and then I must go expose myself to being murdered, and murder men—who have done me no harm—and more than that, whom I love. And this is not a remote contingency, but the very thing we are all preparing for, which is not only probable, but an inevitable certainty.

Why should not the government be put on its trial after every declaration of war?

Governments and the ruling classes no longer take their stand on right or even on the semblance of justice, but on a skillful organization carried to such a point of perfection by the aid of science that everyone is caught in the circle of violence and has no chance of escaping from it. 

This circle is made up now of four methods of working upon men, joined together like the limes of a chain ring.

The first and oldest method is intimidation. This consists in representing the existing state organization—whatever it may be, free republic or the most savage despotism—as something sacred and immutable, and therefore following any efforts to alter it with the cruellest punishments.

The second method is corruption. It consists in plundering the industrious working people of their wealth by means of taxes and distributing it in satisfying the greed of officials, who are bound in return to support and keep up the oppression of the people. 

These bought officials, from the highest ministers to the poorest copying clerks, make up an unbroken network of men bound together by the same interest—that of living at the expense of the people. 

They become the richer the more submissively they carry out the will of the government; and at all times and places, sticking at nothing, in all departments, support by word and deed the violence of government, on which their own prosperity also rests.

The third method is what I can only describe as hypnotizing the people. 

This consists in checking the moral development of men, and by various suggestions keeping them back in the ideal of life, outgrown by mankind at large, on which the power of government rests. 

This hypnotizing process is organized at the present in the most complex manner, and starting from their earliest childhood, continues to act on men till the day of their death. 

It begins in their earliest years in the compulsory schools, created for this purpose, in which the children have instilled into them the ideas of life of their ancestors, which are in direct antagonism with the conscience of the modern world. 

In countries where there is a state religion, they teach the children the senseless blasphemies of the Church catechisms, together with the duty of obedience to their superiors. 

In republican states they teach them the savage superstition of patriotism and the same pretended obedience to the governing authorities. 

The process is kept up during later years by the encouragement of religious and patriotic superstitions. 

The religious superstition is encouraged by establishing, with money taken from the people, temples, processions, memorials, and festivals, which, aided by painting, architecture, music, and incense, intoxicate the people, and above all by the support of the clergy, whose duty consists in brutalizing the people and keeping them in a permanent state of stupefaction by their teaching, the solemnity of their services, their sermons, and their interference in private life—at births, deaths, and marriages. 

The patriotic superstition is encouraged by the creation, with money taken from the people, of national fêtes, spectacles, monuments, and festivals to dispose men to attach importance to their own nation, and to the aggrandizement of the state and its rulers, and to feel antagonism and even hatred for other nations. 

With these objects under despotic governments there is direct prohibition against printing and disseminating books to enlighten the people, and everyone who might rouse the people from their lethargy is exiled or imprisoned. 

Moreover, under every government without exception everything is kept back that might emancipate and everything encouraged that tends to corrupt the people, such as literary works tending to keep them in the barbarism of religious and patriotic superstition, all kinds of sensual amusements, spectacles, circuses, theatres, and even the physical means of inducing stupefaction, as tobacco and alcohol, which form the principal source of revenue of states. 

Even prostitution is encouraged, and not only recognized, but even organized by the government in the majority of states. So much for the third method.

More about the hypnotizing influence of the state

This strange and abnormal condition of men under state organization is usually expressed in the following words: ‘As a man, I pity him; but as guard, judge, general, governor, tzar, or soldier, it is my duty to kill or torture him.’

Strange as it may seem, the sole explanation of this astonishing phenomenon is that they are in the condition of the hypnotized, who feel and act like the creatures who are commanded by the hypnotizer.

When, for instance, it is suggested to the hypnotized subject that he is lame, he begins to walk lame, that he is blind, and he cannot see, that he is a wild beast, and he begins to bite. 

This is the state, not only of those who were going on this expedition, but of all men who fulfill their state and social duties in preference to and in detriment of their human duties.

The essence of this state is that under the influence of one suggestion they lose the power of criticizing their actions, and therefore do, without thinking, everything consistent with the suggestion to which they are led by example, precept, or insinuation.

The difference between those hypnotized by scientific men and those under the influence of the state hypnotism, is that an imaginary position is suggested to the former suddenly by one person in a very brief space of time, and so the hypnotized state appears to us in a striking and surprising form, while the imaginary position suggested by state influence is induced slowly, little by little, imperceptibly from childhood, sometimes during years, or even generations, and not in one person alone but in a whole society.




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